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landscape::resources::thymes
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  In addition to culinary thyme (Thymus vulgaris), the Thyme genus contains a wide variety of creeping plants and small shrubs, all with small leaves and flowers in white, pink and pinkish-lavender hues. Most thymes are drought tolerant once established, though all need some water. Some have wonderful scented leaves; others are scentless. Some work well between pavers in a path or patio; others drape over a stone wall in a glorious shower. I've split my list into sections based on the plant's habit.
 
bush thymes
 
 
 These thymes have an upright, bushy habit, and usually grow to between 12 and 24 inches tall and wide. They're too tall to place between paving stones, but can be used next to paths or in beds. Bush thymes included: broussonetii, camphoratus, capitatus, T. leucotrichus, mastichina, 'Orange Balsam', and 'Rose Williams'.
 
low thymes
 
 
 These thymes sprawl across the ground and are up to 3 to 4 inches tall. They're too tall to place between paving stones, but can be used next to paths or in beds. Low thymes included: cilicicus, 'Clear Gold', 'Doone Valley', and 'Long Leaf Gray'.
 
carpet thymes
 
 
 These thymes spread across the ground and are up to 1 to 2 inches tall. They can be grown between paving stones, next to paths, or in beds with other spreading thymes. Carpet thymes included: Coccineus Group, 'Coconut', 'Evergold', 'Linear Leaf Lilac', neiceffii, 'Pink Chintz', 'Thomas' White', and 'Uncle Wayne'.
 
mat thymes
 
 
 These thymes spread across the ground and are less than an inch tall. They can be grown between paving stones, next to paths, or in beds with other spreading thymes. Matting thymes included: 'Minor' and 'Elfin'.
 
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